Co-Branding by LUDOCo-Branding by LUDO

Ludo is a Paris based street artist, with his last series, called “Co-Branding”, he invades public spaces in bus stops, exposing his artworks as ad campaign posters with anti-brand messages
Ludo è un street artist residente a Parigi, con la sua ultima serie chiamata “co-branding” invade gli spazi, pensiline degli autobus esponendo i suoi lavori abbinati a marchi commerciali, creando una una campagna anti brand.

“Who decides what messages and images are displayed in the public? When it comes to advertising, images and graphics are supposedly governed by “community standards”, meaning a body of some sort passes judgment on the worthiness of an image or message based on a common understanding of the collective opinion. More often than not, unless there is a vocal protest from a potent fraction of a community, standards are merely the guidelines to push against to grab attention and a tiny piece of mind share.
As these standards evolve, so do the broadly drawn boundaries of what an advertiser can use to sell a product, whether it is on a sticker, billboard, mural, or high-gloss kiosk. “It’s almost like you can put a dildo on a billboard as long as the brand or logo is there to validate it as another normal commercial,” says French Street Artist Ludo, who has been merging his art with well recognized brands on Parisian bus shelters.”

Jaime Rojo & Steven Harrington for the Huffington Post

http://www.thisisludo.com



Other works

“Who decides what messages and images are displayed in the public? When it comes to advertising, images and graphics are supposedly governed by “community standards”, meaning a body of some sort passes judgment on the worthiness of an image or message based on a common understanding of the collective opinion. More often than not, unless there is a vocal protest from a potent fraction of a community, standards are merely the guidelines to push against to grab attention and a tiny piece of mind share.
As these standards evolve, so do the broadly drawn boundaries of what an advertiser can use to sell a product, whether it is on a sticker, billboard, mural, or high-gloss kiosk. “It’s almost like you can put a dildo on a billboard as long as the brand or logo is there to validate it as another normal commercial,” says French Street Artist Ludo, who has been merging his art with well recognized brands on Parisian bus shelters.”

Jaime Rojo & Steven Harrington for the Huffington Post

http://www.thisisludo.com



Other works

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