Koikoikoi interviews Kid Acne

Koikoikoi made this interview for the fourth issue of italian magazine Bang Art, out now (you can buy it here). We had this interview, for our and for Bang Art’s readers, with Kid Acne, english street artist, illustrator and… rapper

Koikoikoi ha realizzato questa intervista per il quarto numero della rivista italiana Bang Art, appena uscito in edicola o acquistabile dal sito bangart.it. Abbiamo intervistato, per voi e per i lettori di Bang Art, Kid Acne, street artist, illustratore e… rapper inglese.


Koikoikoi: Let’s start with a quite obvious question: you’re a musician and a visual artist at the  same time. If I ask you which one is the job and which one is an hobby, what  would you say?
Kid Acne: Well, they both started out as hobbies, but I would say I am an artist first and a musician second. I don’t see either as a job, but I am self sufficient as an artist. With music, I rely on my friends – so I guess it’s less regular.

WheatPaste_Barcelona_2009_6

K: What the deepest connection between your music and your art?
KA: The only real connection is that I make them both. I suppose Graffiti and Rap both come from Hip-Hop, but as I get older, my music is less-rap and my art is less-graffiti. It’s just my personality presented in different formats depending on what I feel like doing or want to try and say.

SaoPaulo_2008

K: You have a strange way to be a “graffitist”. You have an entire world of charachters and you prefer to draw “scene” that told a sort of story than usual letters or tags. Where you find the inspiration for your works? Where are your characters from?
KA: I’ve always painted letters and tags and I still do, but it’s not enough to express everything I want to say. Some people are happy to only paint letters, but after some time I felt I was just adding to mediocrity and not really having my own voice. Graffiti is important schooling, but it is also about having your own style and breaking conventions. I come from a graffiti background, not a Street Art background, but I think the inspiration for my work came from wanting to see things I didn’t see in regular graffiti and I was trying to present some of these things to a wider audience, not just graffiti writers. Actually, many Graffiti Writers would ask me to paint characters because they were different to the usual stuff and they wanted to see some changes too! My work is not groundbreaking, it’s not the best, but I am proud to say it’s mine! It’s my style and my personality. I see many people creating things that look competent, but it’s not really theirs – they stole it from books and the internet. Individual style and personality is most important I think, otherwise you’re just painting by numbers.

kidacnegirls

K: Your style looks very “handmade”, how’s your relation with digital design?
KA: I draw everything by hand. I never use a ruler to measure things, but I do use a computer to lay out work for print. My favourite mediums are screen-print and spray-paint. I never mix them together, but I love the analogue process of them both. Everything is better in real life.

K: Have you got any “art-hero” you look at? And a “music-hero?” Both in the past or in the present…
KA: I would say my art heroes are Ramm:Ell:Zee and Quentin Blake. My music heroes are perhaps Beastie Boys, New Kingdom and Mark E. Smith. The artist who has influenced me most however is She One and the musician I learnt from the most from is his brother-in-law, Req One. They are both true heroes!

K: Tell us something about the environment you’’ve grown up in. Did the fact of  being in a small town and not in a big city like London influence you in some way? How’s the street art scene changed in these years in front of your eyes, for you that lived both like visual and music artist?
KA: I grew up in a small town – a nice, quiet place, but also the kind of place where it’s easy to get lost in drugs or get someone pregnant at a young age. I was the only kid who did graffiti, but I really enjoyed having non-graffiti friends. We used to go on road trips, have BBQ’s, swim outdoors, play in bands, get drunk, take drugs, make music and make comics – basically anything to escape boredom. It was good, fun place to grow up, but I would hate to live there now. I moved to Sheffield when I was 17 to study Fine Art and I stayed here since then. It’s a good base, there’s not much of a graffiti scene, but i have a lot of good friends here and it’s also surrounded by beautiful countryside. I go to London regularly and also travel abroad as much as possible. Living in Sheffield means I can travel round the world but also have somewhere to come back to I can call home.

WheatPaste_Barcelona_2009_1

K: You’ve always been inclined to experimentation, trying to distinguish yourself. Have you got any advice in this moment, where on the internet you can find a lot of inspirations but also a leveled language? You have a blog, so what’’s your relationship with the internet? Which sites do you surf?
KA: I really hate the internet. I had a basic website 7 or 8 years ago and then decided to take it offline because it just felt pointless. I went on FaceBook for 6 months and deleted that too. I have a My Space page, but i keep thinking about deleting that too. I started a Blog 18 months ago. The main reason was to keep track of my work output. It’s nice to look back over a year and think “I actually did something this year. When did that happen?” I try to keep my blog strictly artwork, but it is only really 5% of what I do. I don’t want everything I do on the internet, but it’s a necessary evil – i got sick of seeing shitty photos of my work on Flickr and decided “If you can’t beat them, join them” – so here i am! It’s nice to have control of your work, but it’s also nice to let go. Once it’s on my site – i don’t think about it anymore and i don’t care about Flickr anymore either. I’m glad people like my work enough to photograph it and put it on the internet, i’m just glad i have my own site too. I check a few websites, but i much prefer finding old music videos on You Tube. There’s some classic stuff out there + i don’t have a TV.

K: Can you tell us something about your so much different experience.  Designing art toys for Kidrobot, skateboards, totem, also apparel… What the different for you at the beginning of each project? You try yourself to get closer to the client or maybe you do your stuff and only after you adapt it to the new “media”?
KA: I’m interested in different print processes, but really everything starts the same – with a sketch. I don’t really look for work. People often contact me. I had an agent for a while, but they never got me any work and it’s nice to do things on your own if you can. Some companies are good to work for, some aren’t. The best work is usually the stuff you never get paid for, but I don’t really change what i do. If a company likes my work, cool. If not, they can find someone else. it doesn’t matter if it’s £50 or £5,000 – i always do my own thing, you just need to remind yourself that that’s the reason they contacted you in the first place!

rollinstock1

K: Where will be Kid Acne in 2014? And in 2019? And in 2059? You know, a sort of crazy time travel!
KA: Well, 2014 is not so long away, so i’ll probably be doing the same kind of thing. I hope i’m not dead before 2059, but if i am – please play ‘Ooh La La’ by the Faces at my funeral, followed by ‘Infiltrate 202’ by Altern 8 and ‘Tribal Bass’ by Rebel MC. Thanks for your interest. Peace out. x

You'llMissMe-Sheffield2008

Dont’ miss the new Bang Art issue, where, beside this interview you can find many other interesting contents and 2 pages by Koikoikoi!

Immagine 4

Extra content:

YouTube Preview Image

Koikoikoi: Iniziamo con una domanda abbastanza ovvia: sei un musicista e un visual artist allo stesso tempo. Se ti chiediamo quale dei due è il lavoro e quale è l’hobby, cosa rispondi?
Kid Acne: Be’, sono iniziati entrambi come hobby, ma direi che sono un artista prima di tutto e poi un musicista. Anche quello dell’artista non lo vedo come un lavoro, ma mi rende autosufficiente. Come musicista dipendo dai miei amici, quindi direi che è meno regolare.

WheatPaste_Barcelona_2009_6

K: Qual è il legame principale tra la tua musica e la tua arte?
KA: L’unica connessione è che faccio entrambe le cose. I graffiti e il rap derivano entrambi dall’hip hop, ma più vado avanti con l’età e meno la mia musica è rap e la mia arte si avvicina ai graffiti. Si tratta semplicemente della mia personalità espressa in modi differenti a seconda di cosa mi sento di fare o cosa voglio dire in quel momento.

SaoPaulo_2008

K: Hai un modo originale di essere un graffitista. Hai un intero mondo di personaggi e preferisci disegnare scene che sembrano raccontare una storia, non ti limiti alle classiche scritte e tags, e anche dove usi solo il lettering, sembri voler infondere una storia ai tuoi pezzi. Dove trovi l’ispirazione per i tuoi lavori? Dove nascono i tuoi personaggi?
KA: Ho sempre dipinto lettere e tags e lo faccio ancora, ma non sempre sono abbastanza per esprimere quello che voglio dire. Alcune persone si accontentano di scrivere solo lettere, e anch’io lo facevo un tempo, ma poi ho sentito che stavo solo uniformandomi alla mediocrità e non avevo davvero una voce mia. I graffiti sono una scuola importante, ma ci vuole anche il proprio stile e bisogna rompere le convenzioni. Io vengo da un background di writing, non di street art, ma penso che l’ispirazione derivi dalla volontà di vedere cose che normalmente non si vedono nei classici graffiti e di presentarle a un pubblico più vasto che non quello di soli writers. In realtà furono anche alcuni di loro a chiedermi di dipingere i miei personaggi, perché li trovavano diversi dalle solite cose e volevano vedere qualcosa di originale. Il mio lavoro non è all’avanguardia, non è il migliore che ci sia, ma sono fiero di poter dire che è mio! è il mio stile e la mia personalità. Vedo molta gente creare cose che all’apparenza sono molto convincenti, ma non sono le loro – le hanno rubate da qualche book o da Internet. Lo stile individuale e la personalità sono la cosa più importante, penso, altrimenti stai solo colorando degli spazi numerati.

kidacnegirls

K: Uno stile molto analogico… e qual è invece il tuo rapporto con l’arte digitale?
KA: Disegno tutto a mano libera. Non uso mai riga e squadra e utilizzo il computer solo per impostare i lavori per la stampa. Le mie tecniche preferite sono la serigrafia e lo spray, ma non le mischio mai, mi piace il processo analogico di entrambe.
è tutto migliore nella vita reale.

K: Hai qualche eroe nel mondo dell’arte? E nella musica? Sia nel passato che nel presente
KA: Direi che i miei eroi in campo artistico sono Ramm:Ell:Zee e Quentin Blake. I miei eroi musicali forse i Beastie Boys, New Kingdom e Mark E. Smith. L’artista che mi ha influenzato di più comunque è She One e il musicista dal quale ho imparato di più è suo cognato, Req One. Sono entrambi i miei veri eroi!

K:Dicci qualcosa dell’ambiente in cui sei cresciuto. Il fatto di vivere in una piccola città e non in una metropoli come Londra ti ha influenzato in qualche modo? Secondo te come è cambiata la scena street art in questi anni, per te che l’hai vissuta sia da musicista che da artista?
KA: Sono cresciuto in una piccola città, un posto carino e tranquillo, ma anche il tipo di posto dove è facile perdersi con le droghe o sposarsi molto presto. Ero l’unico ragazzino a fare graffiti, ma è stato bello avere amici non graffitisti. Facevamo gite, barbecue, andavamo a nuotare, suonavamo in band, ci ubriacavamo e prendevamo droghe, facevamo musica e fumetti, in pratica qualunque cosa per sfuggire alla noia.
Era un buon posto dove crescere, ma odierei vivere lì adesso. Ho traslocato a Sheffield quando avevo diciassette anni per studiare all’Accademia di Belle Arti e non mi sono più mosso da allora. è una buona sistemazione, anche se non c’è molto per quanto riguarda la scena graffiti, ma ho tanti amici e sono circondato da una bellissima campagna. Vado a Londra regolarmente e viaggio all’estero il più possibile. Vivere a Sheffield significa poter viaggiare per il mondo, ma anche avere un posto dove tornare chiamato casa.

WheatPaste_Barcelona_2009_1

K: Sei sempre stato incline alla sperimentazione nel tentativo di distinguerti. Hai qualche consiglio? In questo periodo storico, con Internet si possono avere un sacco di fonti di ispirazione, ma anche un’omologazione del linguaggio? Che siti navighi?
KA: Odio veramente Internet. Avevo un sito molto basilare sette o otto anni fa, ma poi l’ho eliminato perché lo trovavo senza senso. Ho usato Facebook per sei mesi, poi ho cancellato il mio profilo. Ho una pagina su MySpace, ma continuo a pensare di elimare anche quella. Ho iniziato un blog diciotto mesi fa. La ragione principale era tenere traccia dei miei lavori. è bello guardarsi indietro dopo un anno e poter dire: «Ho davvero fatto qualcosa quest’anno. Quand’è successo?». Cerco di tenere il mio blog strettamente per i miei lavori, ma sono solo il 5% di quello che faccio. Non voglio che tutto quello che creo finisca su Internet, ma è un male necessario, non ne potevo più di vedere foto orrende dei miei lavori su Flickr e ho pensato: «Se non puoi batterli, unisciti a loro»… Ed eccomi qui! è bello poter avere il controllo sui propri lavori, ma è anche bello lasciar andare. Una volta che sono sul mio sito non ci penso più, non mi interessa più niente nemmeno di Flickr. Sono felice che alla gente piacciano i miei lavori abbastanza da fotografarli e metterli online e sono felice di avere il mio sito personale. Guardo qualche sito, ma preferisco vedere vecchi video musicali su YouTube. Ci sono veramente dei classici e per di più io non ho la TV.

K: Cosa ci racconti della tua esperienza così variegata? Disegnare toys per Kidrobot, skate, totem, abbigliamento… Cosa cambia per te all’inizio di ogni progetto? Cerchi di avvicinarti all’esigenza del cliente oppure fai le tue cose e solo dopo le adatti al supporto?
KA: Mi interessano diversi processi di stampa, ma ogni cosa inizia allo stesso modo: con uno schizzo.
Non cerco molto il lavoro, la gente mi contatta. Ho avuto un agente per un periodo, ma non mi ha procurato nessun lavoro e poi è bello fare le cose per conto proprio se ci si riesce. Alcuni clienti sono buoni, altri meno. Il lavoro migliore è solitamente quello per il quale non vengo pagato, ma non cambia quello che faccio. Se a un’azienda piace il mio lavoro bene, altrimenti possono trovare un altro. Non importa se sono 50 sterline o 5000, io faccio sempre le mie cose. Bisogna sempre ricordare che è per quello che ti hanno contattato all’inizio.

rollinstock1


K: Dove sarà Kid Acne nel 2019? E nel 2059? Sai, una specie di viaggio nel tempo ideale…

KA: Il 2019 non è poi così lontano, quindi probabilmente starò ancora facendo le stesse cose di oggi. Spero di non essere morto prima del 2059, se così sarà, per favore suonate Ooh La La dei The Faces al mio funerale, seguita da Infiltrate 202 degli Altern 8 e Tribal Bass di Rebel MC. Peace out.

You'llMissMe-Sheffield2008

Non perdete il nuovo numero di Bang Art, dove, oltre a questa intervista trovate molti altri contenuti interessanti e 2 intere pagine curate e firmate da Koikoikoi!

Immagine 4

Contenuti extra::

YouTube Preview Image

TEST